Lavanya Selvaraj's Blog

Posts Tagged ‘Inspiration

 

Embodiment of Love

During the II world war in 1941, it was a difficult time for our family at Rameswaram. I was a ten year old boy then. War had almost reached our doors of Rameswaram since the cloud of war had already reached Colombo. Almost everything was a rarity from food articles to anything. Ours was a large joint family. The size of our family was five sons and five daughters and three of whom had families. I used to see in my house anytime three cradles. My grandmother and mother were almost managing this large contingent.

The environment in the home alternated by happiness and sadness. I used to get up at four in the morning, take bath and went to my teacher Swamiyar for learning mathematics. He will not accept students if they had not taken bath. He was a unique mathematics teacher and he used to take only five students for free tuition in a year. My mother used to get up before me, and gave bath to me and prepared me to go for the tuition.

I use to comeback at 5:30 when my father would be waiting for taking me to the Namaz and Koran Sharif learning in Arabic school. After that I used to go to Rameswaram Road Railway station, three kilometers away to collect newspaper. Madras Dhanushkodi Mail will pass through the station but will not stop, since it was war time. The newspaper bundle will be thrown from the running train to the platform.

I used to collect the paper and run around the Rameswaram town and be the first one to distribute the newspapers in the town. My elder cousin brother was the agent who went away to Sri Lanka in search of better livelihood. After distribution, I used to come home at 8 AM. My mother will give me a simple breakfast with a special quota compared to other children because I was studying and working simultaneously.

After the school gets over in the evening, again I will go around Rameswaran for collection of dues from customers. I still remember an incident which I would like to share with you. As a young boy I was walking, running and studying all together. One day, when all my brothers and sisters were sitting and eating, my mother went on giving me chapattis (even though we are rice eaters only, wheat was rationed). When I finished eating, my elder brother called me privately and scolded “Kalam do you know what was happening? You went on eating Chappati, and mother went on giving you. She has given all her chappatis to you. It is difficult time. Be a responsible son and do not make your mother starve”.

First time I had a shivering sensation and I could not control myself. I rushed to my mother and hugged her. Even though I was studying in 5th class, I had a special place in my home because I was the last guy in the family. There used to be no electricity. Our house was lit by the kerosene lamp that too between 7 to 9 PM. My mother specially gave me a small kerosene lamp so that I can study up to 11 PM. I still remember my mother in a full moon night which has been portrayed with the title “mother” in my book “Wings of Fire”.

Mother
“I still remember the day when I was ten,
Sleeping on your lap to the envy of my elder brothers and sisters.
It was full moon night, my world only you knew Mother!, My Mother!
When at midnight, I woke with tears falling on my knee
You knew the pain of your child, My Mother.
Your caring hands, tenderly removing the pain
Your love, your care, your faith gave me strength,
To face the world without fear and with His strength.
We will meet again on the great Judgment Day. My Mother!

This is the story of my mother who lived ninety three years, a woman of love, a woman of kindness and above all a woman of divine nature. My mother performed Namaz five times everyday. During Namaz, my mother always looked angelic. Every time I saw her during Namaz I was inspired and moved.

By,

Dr. APJ Abdulkalam

 

WISH YOU ALL VERY HAPPY MOTHER’S DAY…

 

Source:

Dr. Kalam’s Page

Article: My Mother – Aug 1, 2008

http://www.abdulkalam.com/kalam/jsp/display_content.jsp?menuid=22&menuname=Dr.Kalam%F6s%20Page&linkid=130&linkname=Profile&content=896&columnno=0&starts=0&menu_image=-&myheader=My%20Mother&titlename=null

 

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Marketing is composed of Advertising, Sales, Building and maintaining customer relations and business development strategies…….. Therefore in order to achieve success of the marketing product, it is imperative to understand how advertising influences consumer behaviour and helps companies in increasing demand of the product…….

It’s the story of one of the most successful campaigns in the history of advertising – Apple’s  ‘Think different’ campaign

It not only explains an original idea or a beautiful ad, the campaign actually worked, and how…

During the 90’s Apple was in a crisis, and with only one campaign they have managed to climb out of this slump.

Steve Jobs once said:

“It only took 15 . . . 30 . . . may be 60 seconds to re-establish Apple’s counter-culture image that it had lost during the 90s”.

Here you can see the television ad, but make sure you click continue to read the entire story and to see the amazing print campaign.

HISTORY

In 1977, Steve Jobs founded Apple together with Steve Wozniak, Ronald Wayne and Mike Markkula. In 1985 Jobs resigned from Apple after losing a struggle with the board of directors. From that point on John Sculley, the CEO of Apple, made significant changes to the marketing strategy. He was not fond of the legendary 1984 ad.

But Jobs, Bill Campbell, Steve Wozniak, and Lee Clow (the creative director at Chiat/Day) convinced him to air it anyway and it became one of the most popular TV commercials in history.

In 1985 Apple was not so lucky with it’s Lemmings ad, it was a complete flop. This led to the termination of the contract with Chiat/Day, which had handled Apple’s PR for its entire history.

Lemmings Ad



From that point on Apple focused on more conventional ads. May be this was the cause (maybe not) of the deterioration of Apple’s image. By that time Apple had lost hundreds of millions and cut thousands of jobs. Steve Jobs was disgusted by this and slowly regained control of the company. One of his top priorities was a renewal of Apple’s image.

Lee Clow and his team from TBWA Chiat/Day said that Apple should be aligned with the creativity of personalities and people making an impact on the twentieth century.

They presented a new slogan and for Apple’s ads:

THINK DIFFERENT  (perhaps a reference to IBM’s famous “THINK IBM” slogan).

Jobs gave the group 17 days after approval to complete the entire campaign. That included the television commercial and billboards. A similar campaign for another client would have taken much longer just to get rights to the images. But Jobs pulled some strings to get usage rights from celebrities including Joan Baez and Yoko Ono (once a neighbour). If Clow had approached these people, he would be another adman. When Jobs called, he was a friend.

It all begun with the television commercial, which first aired on Sept. 28 1997, followed by the print ads, billboards and posters. In 1998 the television spot won the second annual primetime Emmy Award for best commercial from the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (ATAS). The ad also won a Belding, a Silver Lion at Cannes. The long-term campaign won an Effie award for marketing effectiveness.

THE CAMPAIGN:

The campaign consists of two main parts, there is a television commercial and a print campaign.

The television commercial features black and white video footage of significant historical people of the past, including (in order)

Albert Einstein

Bob Dylan

Martin Luther King

Jr.,Richard Branson

John Lennon (with Yoko Ono)

R. Buckminster Fuller

Thomas Edison

Muhammad Ali

Ted Turner

Maria Callas

Mahatma Gandhi

Amelia Earhart

Alfred Hitchcock

Martha Graham

Jim Henson (with Kermit the Frog)

Frank Lloyd Wright and

Pablo Picasso.

The commercial ends with an image of a young girl, Shaan Sahota, opening her closed eyes, as if to see the possibilities before her.

The text of the campaign is narrated by the American actor Richard Dreyfuss. Rumours say that Steve Jobs wrote the original text, for this spot it’s been changed a little.

Text: Here’s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round pegs in the square holes. The ones who see things differently. They’re not fond of rules. And they have no respect for the status quo. You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them. About the only thing you can’t do is ignore them. Because they change things. They push the human race forward. And while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do.

 

APPLE ~ Think Different ~ Successful Ad

 

 

The print campaign was much more elaborate than the television commercial. Over the years there have been dozens of different personalities on the posters. Few print campaigns are as follows:

 

Mahatma Gandhi
Was the pre-eminent political and spiritual leader of India during the Indian independence movement. He was one of the gentlest of men, a devout and almost mystical Hindu, but he had an iron core of determination. Nothing could change his convictions.

 

 

Nelson Mandela
Served as President of South Africa from 1994 to 1999, the first South-African president to be elected in a fully representative democratic election. Before his presidency, Mandela was an anti-apartheid activist.

 

 

After the first campaign, Apple started sending complimentary posters to public schools across the nation featuring different celebrities (including Pablo Picasso, Jane Goodall, and Ron Howard) to hang in classrooms.

 

Does this story proves, great advertising strategy has been known to improve the performance of many businesses, and the most successful companies and products are usually recognized as such……..???

 

Source: http://www.forbes.com/sites/onmarketing/2011/12/14/the-real-story-behind-apples-think-different-campaign/

They are the best in their business, and feature in the Forbes Richest list year after year. So where do you think India’s top CEOs, corporate honchos and business magnates did their business studies?

Top CEOs in India

Ratan Tata
Chairman, Tata Sons

Tata graduated from Cathedral and John Connon School, Mumbai, did his Bachelor of Science degree in architecture from Cornell University in 1962. Then he went to the US to do Advanced Management Program by Harvard Business School in 1975. This Management course at HBS is designed for someone already in the field who wants to better their prospects.

Ratan Tata is also the chairman of Tata Steel, Tata Consultancy Services, Tata Motors, Tata Power, Tata Tea, The Indian Hotels Company, Tata Chemicals and Tata Teleservices. During his tenure, the group’s revenues have grown nearly 13-fold.

Mukesh Ambani
Chairman and MD, Reliance Industries

Mukesh Ambani studied in The Scindia School, Gwalior. He is a chemical engineer from the Institute of Chemical Technology, University of Mumbai. Mukesh pursued his MBA at Stanford University, USA.

With a personal wealth valued at $29 billion by Forbes Magazine, Mukesh Ambani is world’s fourth richest and Asia’s wealthiest person.

Rahul Bajaj
Bajaj Auto

After attending St. Stephen’s College Delhi for his BA Economics, and the Government Law College Bombay for LLB, Rahul Bajaj went to the US to do his MBA from Harvard Business School in 1964.

Being awarded the Padma Bhushan in 2001, Bajaj was listed twentieth on the Forbes India’s Richest in 2010.

Anil Ambani
Chairman, Reliance Anil Dhirubhai Ambani Group

Anil Ambani completed his Bachelor of Science from Mumbai University. He went to the US to do an MBA from The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania.

It is the same university that later honoured Dhirubhai Ambani with the Dean’s Medal for setting an outstanding example of leadership. Anil Ambani is the fourth richest man in India, according to Forbes.

Anand Mahindra
Vice Chairman and MD, Mahindra & Mahindra

Anand Mahindra graduated from Harvard College, Cambridge, Massachusetts and completed his MBA from Harvard Business School, Boston. He is Vice Chairman and Managing Director of Mahindra & Mahindra.


After Anand’s entry, Mahindra & Mahindra started the Kotak Mahindra Bank and Tech Mahindra. The IT section acquired Satyam Computer Services Ltd and renamed it Mahindra Satyam following the 2007 scandal.

Adi Godrej
Godrej Group

Adi Godrej did his bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in management from Massachusetts Institute of Technology before joining the family business.

One of Indian’s richest men, with a net worth of $3.3 billion, Adi Godrej is credited with modernising his family’s business.

KV Kamath
Non-Executive Chairman, ICICI Bank

Kamath was ICICI Bank’s Managing Director and CEO from May 1996 to his retirement in April 2009. Now, He is the Chairman of Infosys Limited, the second-largest IT services company in India.

After completing Higher Secondary and Pre-University from St Aloysius School, Kamath joined the Karnataka Regional Engineering College for Mechanical Engineering. Then, in 1969, he joined the Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad for his Masters in Business Administration.

Last but not the least, here comes the business magnate Dhirubhai Ambani.

Dhirubhai Ambani was an Indian business magnate and entrepreneur who founded Reliance Industries, a petrochemicals, communications, power, and textiles conglomerate and the only privately owned Indian company in the Fortune 500. Dhirubhai has been one among the select Forbes billionaires and has also figured in the Sunday Times list of top 50 businessmen in Asia. His life has often been referred to as a true “rags to riches” story.

Where he did his MBA?

.

.

.

.

Harvard Business School?

.

.

.

No

.

.

Stanford University?

.

.

.

No

.

.

Indian Institute of Management?

.

.

.

No

.

.

The Educational Qualification of Dhirubhai Ambani is just 10th pass

Is it necessary to do MBA to be a Business Magnate…..???

Does any degree in the world has more value than Self confidence & Hard work…..???

 

Source: http://www.knowledgebase-script.com/demo/article-952.html

By refusing to take bribes, the Madurai collector has earned 18 transfers in 20 years, a modest house and bank balance and lots of respect.

On a hot summer afternoon, on Madurai’s busy main road, the district collector, U. Sahayam I.A.S, saw a young man talking on a cell phone while riding a motorbike. He asked his driver to wave the man down, got down from his car and meted out instant punishment: plant 10 saplings within 24 hours. Somewhat unconventional justice, some might say. But that’s how Sagayam works.

‘Lanjam Thavirtthu, Nenjam Nimartthu’ (Reject bribes, hold your head high), says a board hanging above Sagayam’s chair in his modest office. That’s the code he lives by, even if politicians are incensed they cannot bend him their way—he’s been transferred 18 times in the last 20 years—and has made enemies of both superiors and subordinates. “I know I sit under a dangerous slogan and probably alienate people,” he says. “But I have been the same Sagayam from Day 1. Standing up against corruption is not for a season. Nor is it a fad. It’s forever.”

Two years ago, as district collector of Namakkal, he voluntarily declared his assets: a bank balance of Rs 7,172 and a house in Madurai worth Rs 9 lakh. Once, when his baby daughter, Yalini, who had breathing problems, was suddenly taken ill, he did not have the Rs 5,000 needed for admitting her to a private hospital. At that time he was deputy commissioner (excise) in Coimbatore and there were 650 liquor licenses to be given out. The going bribe for each was rumored to be Rs 10,000.

Sagayam started cleaning up Madurai the minute he landed here. The main bus terminus at Mattuthavani looked more like a bazaar, with shops all over the bus-shelters and no waiting place for passengers. Even a police outpost had been turned into a shop.The system was well-oiled with haftas to local politicians and policemen. Sagayam quickly went through the rulebook, cited the relevant clauses and cleaned up the entire area. But didn’t it hit poor shopkeepers who lost their livelihood? “A violation is a violation,” says Sagayam, “but we will help them rehabilitate.” Nageswaran, a taxi-driver and one of Sagayam’s many fans, says, “He’s strict and hasn’t taken even ten paise in bribe during his career”.

He’s like the upright collectors they show in some films, a real hero with integrity.”Sagayam’s masters degrees in social work and law come in useful in his role as an administrator. He knows the rulebooks in detail and is not afraid of using them, however powerful the opponent. No wonder then that Sagayam’s career is marked with the scars of countless battles.

When errant village officers ganged up to get Sagayam transferred, people protested and the order was rescinded. When he was in Kanchipuram as revenue officer, he took on the sand mafia, ordering them to stop dredging sand from the Palar riverbed. Large-scale
dredging had made the area flood-prone. The mafia sent goons to assault Sagayam, but he did not budge and would not take back the order. He also took on a mighty soft-drink MNC when a consumer showed him a bottle with dirt floating in it. He sealed the bottling unit and banned the sale of the soft drink in the city. In Chennai, he locked horns with a restaurant chain and recovered four acres valued at some Rs 200 crore.

Given such credentials, it wasn’t surprising for him to be picked by the Election Commission to oversee elections in Madurai, as famous for its temples as its political gods. During the last polls, Sagayam took on M.K. Azhagiri, the local MP and son of former CM and DMK supreme M. Karunanidhi. He conducted voter awareness campaigns in colleges; the DMK petitioned the court twice, seeking to end what it said was an attempt to influence voters, but the court demurred.

Sagayam’s wife Vimala has stood by him all these years but she was rattled by some of the threats during the elections. “He always says if you are right, nobody can hurt you,” she says. “But sometimes it becomes difficult.”

Sagayam takes a hands-on approach to his work. He holds a Monday ‘durbar’, at which anyone can meet him with their complaints. During tours of the district for review meetings and inspections, he will suddenly stop a school bus to talk to children or duck into a school to take a class. When students tell him they want to be IAS or IPS officers, he asks, “It’s all well to say now that you’ll be honest, but will you remain unbending about not taking bribes throughout your career?”

Some months back, while driving to a village, he found a 92-year-old woman cleaning rice. She said she had to work in order to eat. He immediately sanctioned Rs 1,000 as old-age pension for her. When 60-year-old Vellamma met him during a tour of Uthappanaikkanoor village this week and asked him to grant her a pension, he said, “I can do that. But do you want me to send your son to jail too—for abandoning you?”

He said it with a smile, as a joke, but he has in fact taken action against children who don’t take care of their aging parents.

“I believe, as Mahatma Gandhi said, that India lives in her villages,” says Sagayam, who also idolizes Subhash Chandra Bose. His years as a collector—he has slept overnight in village schools many times—have convinced him to better the lot of villagers by strengthening the village administrative officer (VAO) system.

Many VAOs have never visited villages and often stay miles away from where they should be, in cities. In Namakkal, his action against errant VAOs had them ganging up with politicians to get him transferred. Over 5,000 villagers protested, saying they wouldn’t let Sagayam go. The politicians had to retreat.

Sagayam says he learnt honesty on his mother’s knees. He is the youngest of four sons of a farmer from Pudukottai.“Our adjoining field had mango trees and my friends and I would pick the fallen fruit,” he says.  “But my mother made me throw the mangoes away, saying I should enjoy only what is mine.” Now his daughter Yalini wants to become a collector. When she has an argument with her brother Arun, she asks her father, “Is he really your son? He just told a lie!” Both of them are proud of their father.

Recently, after a long time, the Sagayam family went on a vacation to Kullu in Himachal Pradesh. While visiting a gurudwara, a stranger came up to their father and asked him, “Aren’t you IAS officer Mr Sagayam?” Yalini and Arun have not stopped beaming.

http://www.citehr.com/364992-madurai-collector-mr-sahayam-ias-serving-poor-disadvantaged.html

About a hundred years ago, a man looked at the morning newspaper and to his surprise and horror, read his name in the obituary column. The news papers had reported the death of the wrong person by mistake. His first response was shock.

Am I here or there?

When he regained his composure, his second thought was to find out what people had said about him. The obituary read, “Dynamite King Dies.” And also “He was the merchant of death.” This man was the inventor of dynamite and when he read the words “merchant of death,” he asked himself a question, “Is this how I am going to be remembered?” He got in touch with his feelings and decided that this was not the way he wanted to be remembered.

From that day on, he started working toward peace.

His name was Alfred Nobel and he is remembered even today by the great Nobel Prize.

 (1) Mahatma Gandhi inspired millions of people world over to take the path of non-violence and civil disobedience. 5 world leaders who got Noble Peace prize viz. Martin Luther King Jr. (USA), Dalai Lama (Tibet), Aung San Suu Kyi (Myanmar), Nelson Mandela (S. Africa) and Adolfo Perez Esquivel (Argentina) have acknowledged the fact that they were influenced by the philosophy of Gandhi. Yet, Mahatma Gandhi; the man who inspired these Nobel Peace Prize winners, never got a Noble Prize !

It is a loss for the Noble – the prize; not for Gandhi – the man who is above all prizes.

(2) Gandhi spoke English with an Irish accent, as one of his first teachers was an Irishman.

(3) During the freedom struggle, he wore nothing but a loin cloth, but for years he lived in London and used to wear a silk hat and spats and carried a cane.

(4) He was educated at London University and became an attorney. But the first time he attempted to make a speech in court, his knees trembled, and he was so frightened that he had to sit down in confusion and defeat.

(5) As a lawyer in London, he got nowhere at all. He was practically a failure there. Years before, when he first came to England, his Irish teacher made him copy the Sermon on the Mount, over and over again, purely as an exercise in English. Hour after hour, Gandhi wrote “Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth. . . . Blessed are the peacemakers for they shall be called the children of God,” and these words made a profound impression on him.

(6) Later, he was sent to South Africa to collect some huge debts; and he tried to apply there the philosophy of the Sermon on the Mount. And it worked. Clients flocked to Gandhi because he settled their claims peacefully out of court and saved them time and expense.

(7) His income during those days in South Africa touched fifteen thousand dollars a year! Something still a dream for most Indians!

(8) However, despite this worldly success he was not happy. On seeing the untold misery of millions of his fellow countrymen; on seeing thousand of them dying of starvation; the worldly success seemed cheap and unimportant to him. He gave up all his money and ‘took the vow of poverty, and since that time, he consecrated his life to helping the poor and the downtrodden.

(9) On seeing the hopeless condition of one tenth of India which was living in a hungry and half-starved state, Mahatma Gandhi pleaded with them to cease bringing children into a world filled with so much misery and want.

(10) Mahatma Gandhi experimented with diets to see how cheaply he could live and remain healthy. He started living principally on fruit and goats’ milk and olive oil.

(11) Mahatma Gandhi got inspiration of Civil Disobedience by reading a book of an American! He had been greatly influenced by the teachings of an American by the name of David Thoreau. Thoreau was graduated from Harvard University ninety years ago, and then spent twenty-eight dollars building a cabin for himself on the lonely shores of Walden Pond, in Massachusetts. He lived there like a hermit, and refused to pay taxes; so he was thrown into jail. He then wrote a book on Civil Disobedience, saying that no one ought to pay taxes. People didn’t pay the slightest attention to his book then; but, seventy-five years later, Gandhi read that book, away out in India, and decided to use Thoreau’s tactics. He felt that England had not kept her promise to give India self-government; so, in order to punish England, Gandhi urged the people of India to go to jail rather than pay taxes, and he also urged his followers to boycott English goods. When the British placed a tax on salt, Gandhi led his follower to the sea and they made their own salt.

(12) Mahatma Gandhi never visited the US, but he had many American fans and followers. One of his more unusual admirers was Henry Ford. Gandhi sent him an autographed charkha (spinning wheel) through a journalist emissary. During the darkest days of the Second World War, Ford, who was struck by the charkhas “mechanical simplicity and high moral purpose,” would often spin on “the symbol of economic independence that Gandhi had sent.

(13) He had a set of false teeth, which he carried in a fold of his loin cloth. He put them in his mouth only when he wanted to eat. After his meal, he took them out, washed them and put them back in his loin cloth again.

(14) The great Scientist Albert Einstein once said about Gandhi:

“Generations to come will scarcely believe that such a one as this (Gandhi) walked the earth in flesh and blood.”

He also once said,

” I believe that Gandhi’s views were the most enlightened of all the political men in our time. We should strive to do things in his spirit: not to use violence in fighting for our cause, but by non-participation in anything you believe is evil.”

The more I read about Gandhi, the more I become humble to the greatness of this man who was seeking nothing for himself but was willing to die in order that others may live.

(15) Gandhi was also a prolific writer. For decades he edited several newspapers including Harijan in Gujarati, Hindi and English, Indian Opinion while in South Africa and, Young India, in English, and Navajivan, a Gujarati monthly. He also wrote a few books including his autobiography, An Autobiography or My Experiments with Truth.

Sources: Little known facts about well known people by Dale Carnegie

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100502105200AAszJJs

I was studying in 5th class at the age of 10 who gave a vision for my life. I had a teacher, Shri Siva Subramania Iyer. He was one of the very good teachers in our school. All of us loved to attend his class and hear him. One day he was teaching about bird’s flight. He drew a diagram of a bird on the blackboard depicting the wings, tail and the body structure with the head. He explained how the birds create the lift and fly. He also explained to us how they change direction while flying. Nearly 25 minutes he gave the lecture with various information such as lift, drag and how the birds fly in a formation of 10, 20 or 30 etc. At the end of the class, he wanted to know whether we understood how the birds fly. I said I did not understand how the birds fly. When I said this, he asked the other students whether they understood or not. Many students said that they did not understand. Our teacher was a real teacher and very good teacher. He did not get upset by our response.

In view of this, my teacher said that he would take all of us to the sea shore. That evening the whole class was in the sea shore. We enjoyed the roaring sea waves knocking at the rocks in the pleasant evening. Birds were flying with sweet chirping voice. He showed the sea birds in formation in 10 to 20 numbers, we have seen the marvelous formation of birds with a purpose and we were all amazed. And we were simply looking at the formation. The teacher showed the birds and asked us to see when the birds fly, what it looked like. We saw the wings being flapped. He explained how the birds flapped the wings to generate the lift. He asked us to look at the tail portion with the combination of flapping wing and twisting tail. We noticed closely and found that the birds in that condition flew in the direction they wanted. Then he asked us a question, where the engine is and how it is powered. Bird is powered by its own life and the motivation what it wants. All these aspects were explained to us within 15 minutes. We all understood the whole bird dynamics with practical example. How nice it was? Our teacher was a great teacher; he could give as a theoretical lesson coupled with live practical example. This is real teaching. I am sure, many of the teachers in schools and colleges will follow this example.

For me, it was not merely an understanding of how a bird flies. The bird’s flight entered into me and created a feeling on the seashore of Rameswaram. From that day evening, I thought that my future study has to be with reference to something to do with flight. At that time, I did not realize that I have to go towards flight science. I am telling this because my teacher’s teaching and the event that I witnessed inspired me to lead to the goal in life. Then one evening after the classes, I asked the teacher, “Sir, please tell me, how to progress further something to do with flight”. He patiently explained to me that I should complete 8th class, and then go to high school, and then I should go to college that may lead to education of flight. If I do all these things I might do something connected with flight sciences. This advice and the bird flying exercise given by my teacher really gave me a goal and a mission for my life. When I went to college, I took Physics. When I went to engineering in Madras Institute of Technology, I took Aeronautical Engineering.

Thus my life was transformed as a rocket engineer, aerospace engineer and technologist. That one incident of my teacher encouraging me to ask questions, showing the visual examples proved to be a turning point in my life which eventually shaped my profession. Shri Sivasubramania Iyer was an example for shaping not just students but igniting the youth both average and extraordinary by allowing them to ask questions and answering them till they fully understood. In essence, teachers, and the teaching environment in the school provides you the knowledge.

I believe there is no other profession in the world that is more important to society than that of a teacher
                                                                                                                                                                                           -A P J Abdul Kalam



HAPPY TEACHERS DAY…….

Source:  http://www.abdulkalam.com


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