Lavanya Selvaraj's Blog

Posts Tagged ‘Famous Personalities

Are women taking charge of their fathers’ businesses because there are no sons around or Are they really up for the bigger role ???

She was enjoying her job in a leading retail house in London when the call from her father came. ” Dad asked me to return to India and join the family business,” says Shradha Suri Marwah. Eleven years later, 33- year- old Shradha, a post graduate from the London School of Economics, has settled into her role as the managing director of her dad Ramesh Suri’s Subros Group.

The Suri sisters are no exception. Today many young women are stepping into their dad’s shoes in the Indian corporate world. A quick Google search will reveal an exhaustive list of Super Successful dad- daughter duos:

  • Roshni and Shiv Nadar of HCL Technologies
  • Divya and B Modi of the Spice Group
  • Ashni and Kishore Biyani of the Future Group
  • Jayanti and Ramesh Chauhan of Parle Bisleri
  • Sminu and Prithvi Jindal of the Jindal Group

to name a few.

 

No Sons or what?

 

This gives rise to an obvious question of why so many women are being enrolled in family businesses all of a sudden.

Is it because there are no sons in the family or Are today’s women more capable of handling the show?

Perhaps it’s a mix of factors.

Some entered the business because there were no brothers, such as Sangita Reddy who has been in Dad Prathap C Reddy’s healthcare business for the last 27 years along with her sisters Preetha, Suneeta and Shobana.

Today Sangita is the executive director, operations, Apollo Group of Hospitals. ” Since my childhood, I heard people referring my father ” poor” Mr Reddy because he had no son,” she says. ” I realised this was a perfect opportunity to prove your mettle and change the tag to ” lucky” Mr Reddy,” she says.

Though things may have been different if Sangita had a brother, Mr Reddy’s decision to rope in his daughters into the business was still rare at the time. In the absence of a son, businessmen would often rope involve nephews or sons- in- law into the group rather than their daughters.

But today many families are doing away with the gender bias and pulling daughters into the fray along with sons. Harish Mariwala, chairman of Maricos, has also brought both his daughter and son into the business. Similarly, Adi Godrej’s daughters Tanya Dubash and Nisha are as much part of the Godrej Group as his son, Pirojsha.

 

HCL Corporation

 

Roshni Nadar, the only daughter of Indian tech billionaire Shiv Nadar, is the Executive Director and the CEO of HCL Corporation. Roshni Nadar did her graduation from the Northwestern University majoring in radio, television and film and did internships with CNBC and CNN.

Her first job was at Sky News in London. Her father however wanted her to go to the B-school and made the point that she could never be a Rupert Murdoch unless she learned how to manage a business. She accordingly completed her MBA in Social Enterprise Management and Strategy from the Kellogg Graduate School of Management.

In B-School young business tycoon acquired a separate set of skills. Her family foundation already being active in the field of education, she felt that she could use those skills best in that sphere. This is something that she really wants to do and it is like her own entrepreneurial venture. Biography of Roshni Nadar is very interesting and reader can learn from her.

 

Shiv Nadar & Roshini...

Shiv Nadar & Roshini…

 

Before becoming CEO of the HCL Corp., Roshni Nadar was trained by her father to take charge of Shiv Nadar Foundation, the family’s philanthropic arm. She had been serving as the trustee of the Shiv Nadar Foundation, which runs the not-for-profit Sri Sivasubramaniya Nadar College of Engineering in Chennai.

She had also been involved in brand building across the HCL Group. Roshni Nadar is overseeing the education initiatives of the Shiv Nadar Foundation. These initiatives include the proposed Shiv Nadar University and the VidyaGyan rural schools aimed at the poor rural children with free education.

Her appointment in April as chief executive of HCL, the holding company that has stakes in Nadar’s two listed flagships, HCL Technologies (India’s fourth-largest software firm) and hardware outfit HCL Info systems, was publicly announced in July 2009.

In 2010, Roshni Nadar was listed among Forbes magazine’s list of ‘a breed of heiresses who choose to live a lower-key life and working to make a difference behind the scenes.’

The young heiress spoke to Forbes’ Mumbai Bureau Chief Naazneen Karmali about the joys (plentiful) and sorrows (none, so far) of her new role and working with daddy dearest.

Forbes: You’re 27, just a year out of B-school and already CEO. Isn’t that too much, too soon?

Roshini Nadar: I’ve been living quietly, away from it all for 27 years. All this sudden media attention is slightly overwhelming. I guess I should be scared! Since coming back last year, I’ve been involved with the holding company’s treasury operations, in brand-building and our social initiatives. My dad had already made me part of the strategic decision-making process relating to the family portfolio.

What made you give up your media career and come back to join the family business?

Media really excited me. As an undergrad, I majored in radio, television and film and did internships with CNBC and CNN. My first job was at Sky News in London. While I was working there, my dad and I had a serious chat about my future career. He was keen that I go to B-school and made the point that I could never be a Rupert Murdoch unless I learned how to manage a business. He also made me realize that there were a lot of responsibilities back home which I could inherit and make something of. That clinched it.

Why aren’t you involved in the tech firms and only in the holding company?

In B-School I discovered social-enterprise management and acquired a separate set of skills. Our family foundation was already active in the field of education, and I felt I could use those skills best in that sphere. This is something I really want to do; it’s like my own entrepreneurial venture. My contribution in the tech companies would have been incremental, as I have so much still to learn. I’m not IT-inclined.

Who’s been the biggest influence in your life?

Along with my dad, my mother’s pretty high up there. She’s a star! Her interests are so diverse–she’s an art collector and a sports enthusiast. She’s an accomplished bridge player and will be representing India next month at the World Bridge Championship in Sao Paulo. In January, we’ll be opening the Kiran Nadar Museum of Art in Delhi to showcase the family’s art collection, which is mainly her handiwork.

Are you intimidated by your parents’ achievements?

Having such high-profile parents could be intimidating, but really they’ve let me do my own thing and evolve as a person. When I changed my major from economics to film, they were cool about it. I’m inspired, not intimidated!

What are the lessons you’ve learned from your dad, and what’s the one thing about him you’d like to change?

I’m still learning. He wants me to focus on the long-term picture, on sustainability. He always insists that I have a Plan B–not just a second option, but a viable one. He’s infinitely more patient than I am! His only weakness is that he tends to micromanage a fair bit.

How do you view the prospect of inheriting the vast family fortune?

I’m just learning how to manage it! Honestly, life is totally normal. Nothing has changed except now I’m more in the spotlight.

You’re getting married soon, so that will be a big change, won’t it?

Not really, because I’ve known my fiancé for 10 years. We met through common friends in Delhi. We’ve had a long-distance relationship for seven years, so coming back home was rather nice. His name is Shikhar Malhotra and he’s a distributor for Honda. His family also has a food distribution business in Kuwait.

 

Does this article proves, “Fathers love their daughter not because of no sons. They love their daughter, so they are not in need of sons”… ???

 

There is a popular saying, “A son is a son till he gets a wife; a daughter is a daughter for the rest of her life”. Father Daughter Relationship is the one which never fades. Fathers always treat their little girl as princesses and No relation in this world would have loved a girl as such as her Father does. Daughter is like angel to him. 

 

Every chapter of woman’s life will always fragrance the kindness & affection of her FIRST SUPER HERO…..

 

WISH YOU ALL VERY HAPPYYY FATHER’S DAY…..

 

 

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Embodiment of Love

During the II world war in 1941, it was a difficult time for our family at Rameswaram. I was a ten year old boy then. War had almost reached our doors of Rameswaram since the cloud of war had already reached Colombo. Almost everything was a rarity from food articles to anything. Ours was a large joint family. The size of our family was five sons and five daughters and three of whom had families. I used to see in my house anytime three cradles. My grandmother and mother were almost managing this large contingent.

The environment in the home alternated by happiness and sadness. I used to get up at four in the morning, take bath and went to my teacher Swamiyar for learning mathematics. He will not accept students if they had not taken bath. He was a unique mathematics teacher and he used to take only five students for free tuition in a year. My mother used to get up before me, and gave bath to me and prepared me to go for the tuition.

I use to comeback at 5:30 when my father would be waiting for taking me to the Namaz and Koran Sharif learning in Arabic school. After that I used to go to Rameswaram Road Railway station, three kilometers away to collect newspaper. Madras Dhanushkodi Mail will pass through the station but will not stop, since it was war time. The newspaper bundle will be thrown from the running train to the platform.

I used to collect the paper and run around the Rameswaram town and be the first one to distribute the newspapers in the town. My elder cousin brother was the agent who went away to Sri Lanka in search of better livelihood. After distribution, I used to come home at 8 AM. My mother will give me a simple breakfast with a special quota compared to other children because I was studying and working simultaneously.

After the school gets over in the evening, again I will go around Rameswaran for collection of dues from customers. I still remember an incident which I would like to share with you. As a young boy I was walking, running and studying all together. One day, when all my brothers and sisters were sitting and eating, my mother went on giving me chapattis (even though we are rice eaters only, wheat was rationed). When I finished eating, my elder brother called me privately and scolded “Kalam do you know what was happening? You went on eating Chappati, and mother went on giving you. She has given all her chappatis to you. It is difficult time. Be a responsible son and do not make your mother starve”.

First time I had a shivering sensation and I could not control myself. I rushed to my mother and hugged her. Even though I was studying in 5th class, I had a special place in my home because I was the last guy in the family. There used to be no electricity. Our house was lit by the kerosene lamp that too between 7 to 9 PM. My mother specially gave me a small kerosene lamp so that I can study up to 11 PM. I still remember my mother in a full moon night which has been portrayed with the title “mother” in my book “Wings of Fire”.

Mother
“I still remember the day when I was ten,
Sleeping on your lap to the envy of my elder brothers and sisters.
It was full moon night, my world only you knew Mother!, My Mother!
When at midnight, I woke with tears falling on my knee
You knew the pain of your child, My Mother.
Your caring hands, tenderly removing the pain
Your love, your care, your faith gave me strength,
To face the world without fear and with His strength.
We will meet again on the great Judgment Day. My Mother!

This is the story of my mother who lived ninety three years, a woman of love, a woman of kindness and above all a woman of divine nature. My mother performed Namaz five times everyday. During Namaz, my mother always looked angelic. Every time I saw her during Namaz I was inspired and moved.

By,

Dr. APJ Abdulkalam

 

WISH YOU ALL VERY HAPPY MOTHER’S DAY…

 

Source:

Dr. Kalam’s Page

Article: My Mother – Aug 1, 2008

http://www.abdulkalam.com/kalam/jsp/display_content.jsp?menuid=22&menuname=Dr.Kalam%F6s%20Page&linkid=130&linkname=Profile&content=896&columnno=0&starts=0&menu_image=-&myheader=My%20Mother&titlename=null

 

 There are two photographs that hang on my office wall.

Every day when I enter my office I look at them before starting my day. They are pictures of two old people. One is of a gentleman in a blue suit and the other is a black and white image of a man with dreamy eyes and a white beard. People have often asked me if the people in the photographs are related to me.

Some have even asked me, “Is this black and white photo that of a Sufi saint or a religious Guru?”
I smile and reply “No, nor are they related to me. These people made an impact on my life. I am grateful to them.”

“Who are they?”

“The man in the blue suit is Bharat Ratna JRD Tata and the black and white photo is of Jamsetji Tata.”
“But why do you have them in your office?”” You can call it gratitude.”

Then, invariably, I have to tell the person the following story.

It was a long time ago. I was young and bright, bold and idealistic. I was in the final year of my Master’s course in Computer Science at  The Indian Institute of Science (IISc) in Bangalore, then known as the Tata Institute. Life was full of fun and joy. I did not know what helplessness or injustice meant.

It was probably the April of 1974. Bangalore was getting warm and gulmohars were blooming at the IISc campus. I was the only girl in my postgraduate department and was staying at the ladies’ hostel. Other girls were pursuing research in different departments of Science. I was looking forward to going abroad to complete a doctorate in computer science. I had been offered scholarships from Universities in the US. I had not thought of taking up a job in India.

One day, while on the way to my hostel from our lecture-hall complex, I saw an advertisement on the notice board. It was a standard job-requirement notice from the famous automobile
company Telco (now Tata Motors).

It stated that the company required young, bright engineers, hardworking and with an excellent academic background, etc.

At the bottom was a small line: “Lady Candidates need not apply.”

I read it and was very upset. For the first time in my life I was up against gender discrimination. Though I was not keen on taking up the job, I saw it as a challenge. I had done extremely well in academics, better than most of my male peers. Little did I know then that in real life academic excellence is not enough to be successful?

After reading the notice I went fuming to my room. I decided to inform the topmost person in Telco’s management about the injustice the company was perpetrating. I got a postcard and started to write, but there was a problem: I did not know who headed Telco. I thought it must be one of the Tatas.
I knew JRD Tata was the head of the Tata Group; I had seen his pictures in newspapers (actually, Sumant Moolgaokar was the company’s chairman then).

I took the card, addressed it to JRD and started writing. To this day I remember clearly what I wrote. “The great Tatas have always been pioneers. They are the people who started the basic infrastructure industries in India, such as iron and steel, chemicals, textiles and locomotives. They have cared for higher education in India, such as iron and steel, chemicals, textiles and locomotives. They have cared for higher education in India since 1900 and they were responsible for the establishment of the Indian Institute of Science. Fortunately, I study there.

But I am surprised how a company such as Telco is discriminating on the basis of gender.”

I posted the letter and forgot about it. Less than 10 days later, I received a telegram stating that I had to appear for an interview at Telco’s Pune facility at the company’s expense. I was taken aback by the telegram.

My hostel mated told me I should use the opportunity to go to Pune free of cost and buy them the famous Pune saris for cheap! I collected Rs.30/- each from everyone who wanted a sari. When I look back, I feel like laughing at the reasons for my going, but back then they seemed good enough to make the trip.

It was my first visit to Pune and I immediately fell in love with the city. To this day it remains dear to me. I feel as much at home in Pune as I do in Hubli, my hometown. The place changed my life in so many ways.

As directed, I went to Telco’s Pimpri office for the interview. There were six people on the panel and I realized then that this was serious business. “This is the girl who wrote to JRD,” I heard somebody whisper as soon as I entered the room. By then I knew for sure that I would not get the job. The realization abolished all fear from my mind, so I was rather cool while the interview was being conducted. Even before the interview started, I reckoned the panel was biased, so I told them, rather impolitely, “I hope this is only a technical interview.” They were taken aback by my rudeness, and even today I am ashamed about my attitude.

The panel asked me technical questions and I answered all of them. Then an elderly gentleman with an affectionate voice told me, “Do you know why we said lady candidates need not apply? The reason is that we have never employed any ladies on the shop floor. This is not a co-ed college; this is a factory. When it comes to academics, you are a first ranker throughout. We appreciate that, but people like you should work in research laboratories.”

I was a young girl from small-town Hubli. My world had been a limited place. I did not know the ways of large corporate houses and their difficulties, so I answered, “But you must start somewhere, otherwise no woman will ever be able to work in your factories.”

Finally, after a long interview, I was told I had been successful. So this was what the future had in store for me. Never had I thought I would take up a job in Pune. I met a shy young man from Karnataka there, we became good friends and we got married.

It was only after joining Telco that I realised who JRD was: The uncrowned king of Indian industry. Now I was scared, but I did not get to meet him till I was transferred to Bombay. One day I had to show some
reports to Mr. Moolgaokar, our chairman, who we all knew as SM. I was in his office on the first floor of Bombay House (the Tata headquarters) when, suddenly JRD walked in. That was the first time I saw “appro JRD”.

Appro means “our” in Gujarati. This was the affectionate term by which people at Bombay House called him. I was feeling very nervous, remembering my postcard episode. SM introduced me nicely, “Jeh (that’s what his close associates called him), this young woman is an engineer and that too a postgraduate. She is the first woman to work on the Telco shop floor.” JRD looked at me. I was praying he would not ask me any questions about my interview (or the postcard that preceded it). Thankfully, he didn’t. Instead, he remarked.

“It is nice that girls are getting into engineering in our country. By the way, what is your name?”

“When I joined Telco I was Sudha Kulkarni, Sir,” I replied. “Now I am Sudha Murthy.”

 He smiled and kindly smile and started a discussion with SM. As for me, I almost ran out of the room.
After that I used to see JRD on and off. He was the Tata Group chairman and I was merely an engineer. There was nothing that we had in common. I was in awe of him. One day I was waiting for Murthy, my husband, to pick me up after office hours. To my surprise I saw JRD standing next to me. I did not know how to react. Yet again I started worrying about that postcard. Looking back,I realise JRD had forgotten about it. It must have been a small incident for him, but not so for me.

“Young lady, why are you here?” he asked.

 “Office time is over.” I said, “Sir, I’m waiting for my husband to come and pick me up.”

JRD said, “It is getting dark and there’s no one in the corridor. I’ll wait with you till your husband comes.”

I was quite used to waiting for Murthy, but having JRD waiting alongside made me extremely uncomfortable.

I was nervous. Out of the corner of my eye I looked at him. He wore a simple white pant and shirt. He was old, yet his face was glowing. There wasn’t any air of superiority about him. I was thinking, “Look at
this person. He is a chairman, a well-respected man in our country and he is waiting for the sake of an ordinary employee.”

Then I saw Murthy and I rushed out. JRD called and said, “Young lady, tell your husband never to make his wife wait again.”

In 1982, I had to resign from my job at Telco. I was reluctant to go, but I really did not have a choice. I was coming down the steps of Bombay House after wrapping up my final settlement when I saw JRD coming up. He was absorbed in thought. I wanted to say goodbye to him, so I stopped. He saw me and paused.

Gently, he said, “So what are you doing, Mrs Kulkarni?” (That was the way he always addressed me.)

“Sir, I am leaving Telco.”

“Where are you going?” he asked.

“Pune, Sir.  My husband is starting a company called Infosys and I’m shifting to Pune.”

“Oh! And what will you do when you are successful.”

“Sir, I don’t know whether we will be successful.”

“Never start with diffidence,” he advised me. “Always start with confidence. When you are successful you must give back to society. Society gives us so much; we must reciprocate. I wish you all the best.”

Then JRD continued walking up the stairs. I stood there for what seemed like a millennium. That was the last time I saw him alive.

Many years later I met Ratan Tata in the same Bombay House, occupying the chair JRD once did.
I told him of my many sweet memories of working with Telco. Later, he wrote to me, “It was nice hearing about Jeh from you. The sad part is that he’s not alive to see you today.”

I consider JRD a great man because, despite being an extremely busy person, he valued one postcard written by a young girl seeking justice. He must have received thousands of letters every day.
He could have thrown mine away, but he didn’t do that

.
He respected the intentions of that unknown girl, who had neither influence nor money, and gave her an opportunity in his company. He did not merely give her a job; he changed her life and mindset forever.

Close to 50 per cent of the students in today’s engineering colleges are girls. And there are women on the shop floor in many industry segments. I see these changes and I think of JRD. If at all time stops and asks me what I want from life, I would say I wish JRD were alive today to see how the company we started has grown. He would have enjoyed it wholeheartedly.

Sudha Kulkarni Murthy, wife of the software genius and industrialist N.R. Narayana Murthy, is also the sister of the popular astrophysicist, Shrinivas Kulkarni. She is best known for her social work and her plethora of stories.  

Her Initial Days and Early Career

In her early days, Sudha Murty was a computer scientist and an engineer. She was born in the year 1950 in the district of Shiggaon in Karnataka.

Sudha Murty scored the highest marks in SSLC (Xth grade) in 1966 from New Education Society Girls English School, Hubli .

Sudha Murthy did her engineering degree from BVB College of Engineering in Hubli. Placed as a topper in the state of Karnataka, she went on to get a medal from the CM for her accomplishment. After completing her Masters in the subject of Computer Science from IISc, Bangalore, she repeated her feat and topped her class, to receive yet another medal from the Engineers Institute.

Sudha was the first computer engineer employed by the company Tata Motors. She also initiated a bold move to introduce computer and library facilities in all schools in Karnataka. She taught computer science and started writing fiction with her first book ‘Dollar Sose’. This book was written in Kannada and later translated to English, and it was even converted into a television serial in 2001 titled ‘Dollar Bahu’.

Career

    • Worked at TELCO as a Development Engineer in Pune, Mumbai and Jamshedpur and later joined Walchand Group of Industries at Pune as Senior Systems Analyst.
    • Involved in the development of Infosys Technologies Ltd., in various capacities & worked as HoD for Computer Science in a reputed college of Bangalore University
    • In 1996, started Infosys Foundation & till date has been the Trustee of Infosys Foundation & a Visiting Professor at the PG Center of a reputed college of Bangalore University
    • Written and published 13 books – out of which, two are travellogues, two technical books, six novels and three educative books.

Awards To Name A Few

    • Gold Medal from the Indian Institute of Engineers, India for having secured the I Rank in MTech of all the branches of Engineering
    • Silver Medal from the then Chief Minister of Karnataka Sri Devaraj Urs, for securing the highest marks in BE of all the Universities of Engineering in Karnataka
    • Cash award for having secured the highest marks in SSLC
    • C S Desai Prize for standing first in the University Exams of Karnataka
    • Youth Service Department Prize from Government of Karnataka, for having been the outstanding engineering student of Karnataka
    • Best Teacher Award in 1995 from the Rotary Club of Bangalore
    • National Award from Public Relation Society of India for outstanding Social Service to the Society
    • ‘Attimabbe’ award for her technical book in Kannada (Shalae Makale Gagi Computer – meaning computers for school children)
    • Award for Excellent Social Service by Rotary South – Hubli
    • ‘Karnataka Rajyotsava’ State Award for the year 2000, for achievement in the field of literature and social work
    • ‘Ojaswini’ award for excellent social worker for the year 2000
    • ‘Millenium Mahila Shiromani’ award
    • Voted as Woman of the Year by RadioCity [Bangalore FM station] on International Women’s Day [2002]
    • Raja-Lakshmi Award 2004 in recognition of her contribution to social work.

Sudha Murthy and Her Books

Being a fiction writer as well, Sudha Murthy has written quite a few stories, which have mostly been released by the renowned publisher Penguin Books. These stories generally have a theme of general and common life in India, and her ideas regarding donation, realisation and hospitality. Some famous stories written by her include:

  • How I Taught My Grandmother To Read
  • Old Man and His God
  • Gently Falls The Bakula
  • The Accolades Galore

In November 2004, Sudha Murty was awarded the Raja-Lakshmi Award by the Sri Raja-Lakshmi Foundation (based in Chennai) for her exemplary efforts in contributing to the society. In the year 2006, she was given the prestigious Padma Shri award, an award of great honour from the Indian Government and she also went on to receive a doctorate from the Sathyabama University in Chennai . Her stories have also been converted to Assamese by Anjan Sharma.  

Her Personal Life

The couple, Sudha and Narayana Murthy are blessed with two kids, Akshata and Rohan. Her daughter Akshata married Rishi Sunak, her batch mate from Stanford. Akshata was previously working at a firm dealing in venture capital, Siderian Ventures, and Rishi is a British citizen with Indian roots. He partners a hedge-fund involved in charity in the UK.

I have never seen such a woman, who have dare to act against injustice when normally women accept the things as they are………Sudha comes across as a teacher, engineer, writer, philanthropist, Mother, Home maker and corporate—all rolled into one…………..

I also admire Mrs. Sudha Murthy for handling different roles efficiently and have million dollar question, How she learned to fit into different shoes ?????????

The essence of success in every role has been universal, says Sudha. ‘‘Whatever you do, do it to your best.” At every job, my motto has been the same—to be honest and sincere to your profession when you are a subordinate and when you are boss, be professional but care for your subordinates. As a mother, be there when your children are home and you are needed.’’   

Only after reading about Sudha Murthy, I learnt Women have that extra quality of adaptability…………

WISH YOU ALL VERY HAPPY WOMEN’S DAY…………

Article sourced from:  Lasting Legacies

(Tata Review- Special Commemorative Issue 2004), brought out by the house of Tatas to commemorate the 100th birth anniversary of JRD Tata on July 29, 2004.

http://www.tata.com/aboutus/articles

 

 

 

 

 

 

WHEN I ASKED GOD FOR STRENGTH ,
HE GAVE ME DIFFICULT SITUATIONS TO FACE .

WHEN I ASKED GOD FOR BRAIN & BROWN ,
HE GAVE ME PUZZLES IN LIFE TO SOLVE .

WHEN I ASKED GOD FOR HAPPINESS ,
HE SHOWED ME SOME UNHAPPY PEOPLE .

WHEN I ASKED GOD FOR WEALTH ,
HE SHOWED ME HOW TO WORK HARD .

WHEN I ASKED GOD FOR FAVORS,
HE SHOWED ME OPPORTUNITIES TO WORK HARD.

WHEN I ASKED GOD FOR PEACE ,
HE SHOWED ME HOW TO HELP OTHERS.

GOD GAVE ME NOTHING I WANTED ,
HE GAVE ME EVERYTHING I NEEDED .

                       

                     – SWAMI VIVEKANANDA

 

WISH YOU & YOUR FAMILY VERY HAPPY & PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR…
 
 

They are the best in their business, and feature in the Forbes Richest list year after year. So where do you think India’s top CEOs, corporate honchos and business magnates did their business studies?

Top CEOs in India

Ratan Tata
Chairman, Tata Sons

Tata graduated from Cathedral and John Connon School, Mumbai, did his Bachelor of Science degree in architecture from Cornell University in 1962. Then he went to the US to do Advanced Management Program by Harvard Business School in 1975. This Management course at HBS is designed for someone already in the field who wants to better their prospects.

Ratan Tata is also the chairman of Tata Steel, Tata Consultancy Services, Tata Motors, Tata Power, Tata Tea, The Indian Hotels Company, Tata Chemicals and Tata Teleservices. During his tenure, the group’s revenues have grown nearly 13-fold.

Mukesh Ambani
Chairman and MD, Reliance Industries

Mukesh Ambani studied in The Scindia School, Gwalior. He is a chemical engineer from the Institute of Chemical Technology, University of Mumbai. Mukesh pursued his MBA at Stanford University, USA.

With a personal wealth valued at $29 billion by Forbes Magazine, Mukesh Ambani is world’s fourth richest and Asia’s wealthiest person.

Rahul Bajaj
Bajaj Auto

After attending St. Stephen’s College Delhi for his BA Economics, and the Government Law College Bombay for LLB, Rahul Bajaj went to the US to do his MBA from Harvard Business School in 1964.

Being awarded the Padma Bhushan in 2001, Bajaj was listed twentieth on the Forbes India’s Richest in 2010.

Anil Ambani
Chairman, Reliance Anil Dhirubhai Ambani Group

Anil Ambani completed his Bachelor of Science from Mumbai University. He went to the US to do an MBA from The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania.

It is the same university that later honoured Dhirubhai Ambani with the Dean’s Medal for setting an outstanding example of leadership. Anil Ambani is the fourth richest man in India, according to Forbes.

Anand Mahindra
Vice Chairman and MD, Mahindra & Mahindra

Anand Mahindra graduated from Harvard College, Cambridge, Massachusetts and completed his MBA from Harvard Business School, Boston. He is Vice Chairman and Managing Director of Mahindra & Mahindra.


After Anand’s entry, Mahindra & Mahindra started the Kotak Mahindra Bank and Tech Mahindra. The IT section acquired Satyam Computer Services Ltd and renamed it Mahindra Satyam following the 2007 scandal.

Adi Godrej
Godrej Group

Adi Godrej did his bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in management from Massachusetts Institute of Technology before joining the family business.

One of Indian’s richest men, with a net worth of $3.3 billion, Adi Godrej is credited with modernising his family’s business.

KV Kamath
Non-Executive Chairman, ICICI Bank

Kamath was ICICI Bank’s Managing Director and CEO from May 1996 to his retirement in April 2009. Now, He is the Chairman of Infosys Limited, the second-largest IT services company in India.

After completing Higher Secondary and Pre-University from St Aloysius School, Kamath joined the Karnataka Regional Engineering College for Mechanical Engineering. Then, in 1969, he joined the Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad for his Masters in Business Administration.

Last but not the least, here comes the business magnate Dhirubhai Ambani.

Dhirubhai Ambani was an Indian business magnate and entrepreneur who founded Reliance Industries, a petrochemicals, communications, power, and textiles conglomerate and the only privately owned Indian company in the Fortune 500. Dhirubhai has been one among the select Forbes billionaires and has also figured in the Sunday Times list of top 50 businessmen in Asia. His life has often been referred to as a true “rags to riches” story.

Where he did his MBA?

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.

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Harvard Business School?

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No

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Stanford University?

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.

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No

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.

Indian Institute of Management?

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No

.

.

The Educational Qualification of Dhirubhai Ambani is just 10th pass

Is it necessary to do MBA to be a Business Magnate…..???

Does any degree in the world has more value than Self confidence & Hard work…..???

 

Source: http://www.knowledgebase-script.com/demo/article-952.html

By refusing to take bribes, the Madurai collector has earned 18 transfers in 20 years, a modest house and bank balance and lots of respect.

On a hot summer afternoon, on Madurai’s busy main road, the district collector, U. Sahayam I.A.S, saw a young man talking on a cell phone while riding a motorbike. He asked his driver to wave the man down, got down from his car and meted out instant punishment: plant 10 saplings within 24 hours. Somewhat unconventional justice, some might say. But that’s how Sagayam works.

‘Lanjam Thavirtthu, Nenjam Nimartthu’ (Reject bribes, hold your head high), says a board hanging above Sagayam’s chair in his modest office. That’s the code he lives by, even if politicians are incensed they cannot bend him their way—he’s been transferred 18 times in the last 20 years—and has made enemies of both superiors and subordinates. “I know I sit under a dangerous slogan and probably alienate people,” he says. “But I have been the same Sagayam from Day 1. Standing up against corruption is not for a season. Nor is it a fad. It’s forever.”

Two years ago, as district collector of Namakkal, he voluntarily declared his assets: a bank balance of Rs 7,172 and a house in Madurai worth Rs 9 lakh. Once, when his baby daughter, Yalini, who had breathing problems, was suddenly taken ill, he did not have the Rs 5,000 needed for admitting her to a private hospital. At that time he was deputy commissioner (excise) in Coimbatore and there were 650 liquor licenses to be given out. The going bribe for each was rumored to be Rs 10,000.

Sagayam started cleaning up Madurai the minute he landed here. The main bus terminus at Mattuthavani looked more like a bazaar, with shops all over the bus-shelters and no waiting place for passengers. Even a police outpost had been turned into a shop.The system was well-oiled with haftas to local politicians and policemen. Sagayam quickly went through the rulebook, cited the relevant clauses and cleaned up the entire area. But didn’t it hit poor shopkeepers who lost their livelihood? “A violation is a violation,” says Sagayam, “but we will help them rehabilitate.” Nageswaran, a taxi-driver and one of Sagayam’s many fans, says, “He’s strict and hasn’t taken even ten paise in bribe during his career”.

He’s like the upright collectors they show in some films, a real hero with integrity.”Sagayam’s masters degrees in social work and law come in useful in his role as an administrator. He knows the rulebooks in detail and is not afraid of using them, however powerful the opponent. No wonder then that Sagayam’s career is marked with the scars of countless battles.

When errant village officers ganged up to get Sagayam transferred, people protested and the order was rescinded. When he was in Kanchipuram as revenue officer, he took on the sand mafia, ordering them to stop dredging sand from the Palar riverbed. Large-scale
dredging had made the area flood-prone. The mafia sent goons to assault Sagayam, but he did not budge and would not take back the order. He also took on a mighty soft-drink MNC when a consumer showed him a bottle with dirt floating in it. He sealed the bottling unit and banned the sale of the soft drink in the city. In Chennai, he locked horns with a restaurant chain and recovered four acres valued at some Rs 200 crore.

Given such credentials, it wasn’t surprising for him to be picked by the Election Commission to oversee elections in Madurai, as famous for its temples as its political gods. During the last polls, Sagayam took on M.K. Azhagiri, the local MP and son of former CM and DMK supreme M. Karunanidhi. He conducted voter awareness campaigns in colleges; the DMK petitioned the court twice, seeking to end what it said was an attempt to influence voters, but the court demurred.

Sagayam’s wife Vimala has stood by him all these years but she was rattled by some of the threats during the elections. “He always says if you are right, nobody can hurt you,” she says. “But sometimes it becomes difficult.”

Sagayam takes a hands-on approach to his work. He holds a Monday ‘durbar’, at which anyone can meet him with their complaints. During tours of the district for review meetings and inspections, he will suddenly stop a school bus to talk to children or duck into a school to take a class. When students tell him they want to be IAS or IPS officers, he asks, “It’s all well to say now that you’ll be honest, but will you remain unbending about not taking bribes throughout your career?”

Some months back, while driving to a village, he found a 92-year-old woman cleaning rice. She said she had to work in order to eat. He immediately sanctioned Rs 1,000 as old-age pension for her. When 60-year-old Vellamma met him during a tour of Uthappanaikkanoor village this week and asked him to grant her a pension, he said, “I can do that. But do you want me to send your son to jail too—for abandoning you?”

He said it with a smile, as a joke, but he has in fact taken action against children who don’t take care of their aging parents.

“I believe, as Mahatma Gandhi said, that India lives in her villages,” says Sagayam, who also idolizes Subhash Chandra Bose. His years as a collector—he has slept overnight in village schools many times—have convinced him to better the lot of villagers by strengthening the village administrative officer (VAO) system.

Many VAOs have never visited villages and often stay miles away from where they should be, in cities. In Namakkal, his action against errant VAOs had them ganging up with politicians to get him transferred. Over 5,000 villagers protested, saying they wouldn’t let Sagayam go. The politicians had to retreat.

Sagayam says he learnt honesty on his mother’s knees. He is the youngest of four sons of a farmer from Pudukottai.“Our adjoining field had mango trees and my friends and I would pick the fallen fruit,” he says.  “But my mother made me throw the mangoes away, saying I should enjoy only what is mine.” Now his daughter Yalini wants to become a collector. When she has an argument with her brother Arun, she asks her father, “Is he really your son? He just told a lie!” Both of them are proud of their father.

Recently, after a long time, the Sagayam family went on a vacation to Kullu in Himachal Pradesh. While visiting a gurudwara, a stranger came up to their father and asked him, “Aren’t you IAS officer Mr Sagayam?” Yalini and Arun have not stopped beaming.

http://www.citehr.com/364992-madurai-collector-mr-sahayam-ias-serving-poor-disadvantaged.html

About a hundred years ago, a man looked at the morning newspaper and to his surprise and horror, read his name in the obituary column. The news papers had reported the death of the wrong person by mistake. His first response was shock.

Am I here or there?

When he regained his composure, his second thought was to find out what people had said about him. The obituary read, “Dynamite King Dies.” And also “He was the merchant of death.” This man was the inventor of dynamite and when he read the words “merchant of death,” he asked himself a question, “Is this how I am going to be remembered?” He got in touch with his feelings and decided that this was not the way he wanted to be remembered.

From that day on, he started working toward peace.

His name was Alfred Nobel and he is remembered even today by the great Nobel Prize.


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